All posts by Josh Getz

Faith & Economics Issue 75 – Spring 2020


Faith & Economics
NUMBER 75, Spring 2020

Editor’s Introduction: COVID-19 and Economic Calculation
Steven McMullen

ARTICLES

The Kuyperian Dream of Reconstructing Economics on Christian Foundations
Paul Oslington

Symposium on The Keynesian Revolution and Our Empty Economy: We’re All Dead by Victor Claar and Greg Forster

Keynes, Consumption and Hollow Prosperity: A Response to Claar and Forster
Todd Steen

Pluralism, Stewardship, and the Church
Brent Waters

Critical Reflections on Claar and Forster’s The Keynesian Revolution and Our Empty Economy
Jamin Andreas Hübner

Authors’ Response
Victor Claar and Greg Forster

BOOK REVIEWS

Becoming Whole: Why the Opposite of Poverty Isn’t the American Dream
By Brian Fikkert & Kelly M. Kapic
A Field Guide to Becoming Whole: Principles for Poverty Alleviation Ministries                            
By Brian Fikkert & Kelly M. Kapic
Reviewed by Bruce Wydick

HUMANOMICS: Moral Sentiments and the Wealth of Nations for the Twenty-First Century
By Vernon L. Smith and Bart J. Wilson
Reviewed by John Lunn

Economics: A Student’s Guide
By Greg Forster
Reviewed by Kenneth G Elzinga

Paul and Economics: A Handbook
Edited by Thomas R. Blanton IV & Raymond Pickett
Reviewed by Kurt C. Schaefer

Beyond Stewardship: New Approaches to Creation Care
Edited by David Paul Warners & Matthew Kuperus Heun
Reviewed by Steven McMullen

Faith & Economics – Spring 2019

Faith & Economics
Number 73 Spring 2019

Articles

Markets and Prophets: An Examination of the Silver Hypothesis
John Lunn and Barry Bandstra

Abstract: We examine a hypothesis by the economic historian, Morris Silver, concerning the role of the prophets in Ancient Israel. Based on a model he developed earlier, Silver speculates that the Hebrew prophets such as Amos and Isaiah were heeded by the government, there was land reform and a movement away from international trade and specialization. The result was a weaker economy and ultimately the destruction of both Israel and Judah as independent nations. Silver utilizes a model he developed relating affluence and altruism, leading to government attempts to benefit the poor. However, the actions only weakened the economy and made the poor worse off. We examine the Hebrew Scriptures, archaeological data and the work of biblical scholars to determine whether Silver’s hypothesis can be supported or refuted. We also examine the model he used as well as other models used by biblical scholars, and argue the models are being used to create data and facts rather than let data support or refute hypotheses.

Key Words: Ancient Israel; altruism; biblical prophets; social science models

The Cost of Being Faithful: What do Farmers Give Up to Keep the Sabbath?
Britney Rosburg, Terry W. Griffin, and Brian Coffey

Abstract: Judeo-Christian beliefs and tradition include observing a Sabbath, or day of rest, by abstaining from work one day each week. In modern times, followers of the Jewish faith mark the Sabbath from Friday evening to Saturday evening and Christians do so on Sunday. For both groups, this practice is firmly entrenched to the point that many contend that working on Sunday is morally wrong. For many Christian workers in the United States, this practice often fits with their work schedule as Saturday and Sunday are typical days off doe many schools, government organizations, and businesses. There are exceptions to this and farmers are one of the most obvious. The demands of managing a farm do not conform to uniform weekly work schedules. To meet labor requirements, many Americans family farms rely upon unpaid family labor to perform tasks such as conducting field operations. Reliance on unpaid labor is becoming more prevalent due to lack of available laborers in many locations in the United States. A whole-farm linear programming model was parameterized as a limited resource Midwestern USA crop-producing farm. Model results estimate the costs of shutting down farm operations for differing levels of Sabbath observation across peak and non-peak seasonal time periods. Results indicate substantial costs are likely to occur, indicating that Sabbath-observing farm operators must perceive at least a base level of perceived benefits. These results are of interest to multi-generational farms attempting to balance work-life issues, researchers evaluating economics of religion, and rural development labor economists studying impacts of decaying populations on rural communities.

Keywords: whole-farm planning; limited resource farms; labor; religion; network; community

Symposium

The Language of Utilitarianism in Economics and the Public Square
Sarah Hamersma

Moral Tribes and Moral Concerns in Public Policy
Ngina Chiteji

Book Reviews

Counting the Cost: Christian Perspectives on Capitalism
Art Lindsley and Anne Bradley
Reviewed by Roger B. Conover

Return to Order
John Horvat II
Reviewed by Kristen Cooper

The Tyranny of Metrics
Jerry Z. Muller
Reviewed by Jamin Hübner

Why Liberalism Failed
Patrick Deneen
Reviewed by Steven McMullen

The Cost of Being Faithful: What do Farmers Give Up to Keep the Sabbath? – Rosburg, Griffin, and Coffey

FAITH & ECONOMICS
NUMBER 73, SPRING 2019

The Cost of Being Faithful: What do Farmers Give Up to Keep the Sabbath?

Britney Rosburg, Terry W. Griffin, and Brian Coffey
Kansas State University

Abstract: Judeo-Christian beliefs and tradition include observing a Sabbath, or day of rest, by abstaining from work one day each week. In modern times, followers of the Jewish faith mark the Sabbath from Friday evening to Saturday evening and Christians do so on Sunday. For both groups, this practice is firmly entrenched to the point that many contend that working on Sunday is morally wrong. For many Christian workers in the United States, this practice often fits with their work schedule as Saturday and Sunday are typical days off doe many schools, government organizations, and businesses. There are exceptions to this and farmers are one of the most obvious. The demands of managing a farm do not conform to uniform weekly work schedules. To meet labor requirements, many Americans family farms rely upon unpaid family labor to perform tasks such as conducting field operations. Reliance on unpaid labor is becoming more prevalent due to lack of available laborers in many locations in the United States. A whole-farm linear programming model was parameterized as a limited resource Midwestern USA crop-producing farm. Model results estimate the costs of shutting down farm operations for differing levels of Sabbath observation across peak and non-peak seasonal time periods. Results indicate substantial costs are likely to occur, indicating that Sabbath-observing farm operators must perceive at least a base level of perceived benefits. These results are of interest to multi-generational farms attempting to balance work-life issues, researchers evaluating economics of religion, and rural development labor economists studying impacts of decaying populations on rural communities.

Key Words: whole-farm planning; limited resource farms; labor; religion; network; community

Full Text PDF

Markets and Prophets: An Examination of the Silver Hypothesis – Lunn and Bandstra

FAITH & ECONOMICS
NUMBER 73, Spring 2019

Markets and Prophets: An Examination of the Silver Hypothesis

John Lunn and Barry Bandstra
Hope College

Abstract: We examine a hypothesis by the economic historian, Morris Silver, concerning the role of the prophets in Ancient Israel. Based on a model he developed earlier, Silver speculates that the Hebrew prophets such as Amos and Isaiah were heeded by the government, there was land reform and a movement away from international trade and specialization. The result was a weaker economy and ultimately the destruction of both Israel and Judah as independent nations. Silver utilizes a model he developed relating affluence and altruism, leading to government attempts to benefit the poor. However, the actions only weakened the economy and made the poor worse off. We examine the Hebrew Scriptures, archaeological data and the work of biblical scholars to determine whether Silver’s hypothesis can be supported or refuted. We also examine the model he used as well as other models used by biblical scholars, and argue the models are being used to create data and facts rather than let data support or refute hypotheses.

Key Words: Ancient Israel; altruism; biblical prophets; social science models

Full Text PDF